Soloing and Odd Meter Ideas

Odd Note Groupings with Triplets

Here are some ideas for your, using odd note groupings with triplets. I guess you could call them even note groupings as well! The inspiration for these ideas came from a timbale solo played by legendary Afro-Cuban musician, Changuito. You can study more about this solo in my book, Practical Applications, and also in the book I wrote with Changuito, Mastering the Art of Cuban Timbales. My suggestion for practicing these ideas is to play a jazz ride pattern with one hand, on ride cymbal, hi hat "2" and "4" or quarter notes, then play the snare bass pattern. Make it as comfortable as possible. Then, play hand to hand on the snare ("R.L.R.L....") with the bass drum. Next, use the sticking supplied and then orchestrate around the drums. Have fun and please write with your comments and suggestions.

odd note groups

odd note groups

More Odd Note Groupings with Triplets

In our last lesson we began to investigate fill and solo ideas using "odd note groupings" with triplets. This lesson is a continuation, with some very nice melodic and rhythmic ideas. The inspiration for these ideas came from a pattern I developed using the cáscara pattern in some interesting ways. Also, one of my good friends, Glen Sobel, inspired these patterns with an interesting permutated paradiddle-diddle phrase. Have fun and please write with your comments and suggestions. The lesson starts with a nine note phrase, using snare, two toms and bass drum. (Hey, just because the notation is a bit skewed, keep the time straight!)

odd note group

Now, play the nine note phrase, twice and add a six note phrase at the end.

These next two phrases are variations, made by inverting the positions of the 9s and 6s.

odd note

odd note

Triplet Groupings Exercise

I enjoy grouping and regrouping different note groupings. With the next few lessons, we'll explore grouping triplets and orchestrating on the drum set. Here's a grouping of triplets, grouped in 6's. HH on 2 and 4 is very important. Try the HH on all quarters as well. Play the jazz ride pattern opposite the grouping.

triplet odd group

Now, here's the same grouping, available to be orchestrated. First play on the snare, then orchestrate and have fun!

triplet odd note

Triplet Groupings Exercise 8s

We just did, in our last lesson, triplets in groupings of 6. Here's a grouping of triplets, grouped in 8's. HH on 2 and 4 is very important. Try the HH on all quarters as well. Play the jazz ride pattern opposite the grouping.

triplet groupings

Now, here's the same grouping, available to be orchestrated. First play on the snare, then orchestrate and have fun!

triplets odd note

Triplet Groupings Exercise 9s

We just did, in our last lesson, triplets in groupings of 8. Here's a grouping of triplets, grouped in 9's. HH on 2 and 4 is very important. Try the HH on all quarters as well. After you get a feel for this pattern, try orchestrating!

triplets odd note

Triplet Groupings Exercise 10s

We just did, in our last lesson, triplets in groupings of 9. Here's a grouping of triplets, grouped in 10's. HH on 2 and 4 is very important. Try the HH on all quarters as well. After you get a feel for this pattern, try orchestrating!

triplet odd group

7/8 Exercises for BD/HH- Duet!

Once again, please do check out John Wooton's book, The Drummer's Rudimental Reference Book. It's an excellent book for developing your hands __and__ feet. These next ideas are the result of working with my private students at the Musicians Institute. I challenged my private students to actually play in 7, using some common subdivisions. That was interesting! Then we came up with these two bass drum/HH patterns. This first one is a relatively common way of play "samba" in 7.

7-8

This is what happens when you play, more or less, the opposite in your feet. Basically, you're playing the BD in between the first, more typical, pattern.

7-8

NOW....play with another drummer! You play one of the patterns, the other drummer plays the other pattern. You'll be playing almost all the 16th notes. It sounds great!! and it's challenging. What I was trying to get my students to do was play each pattern four times and then change. I would play exactly opposite of what my students played. Wow! You need to own the 7*8 feel and really use your brains and ears.

7-8

And lastly, we'll alternately splash and open the HH, closing where you'd normally play the notes, using this new pattern. The ties show how long each open sound lasts.

7-8